Anxiety and Depression

Anxiety is a normal, if unpleasant, part of life, and it can affect us all in different ways and at different times.

Stress is something that will come and go as the external factor causing it (be it a work, relationship or money problems, etc.) anxiety is something that can persist whether or not the cause is clear.

Anxiety can make you imagine that things in your life are worse than they really are, and prevent you from confronting your fears. 

Anxiety can make you imagine that things in your life are worse than they really are, and prevent you from confronting your fears. You may think that you are going mad, or that some psychological imbalance is at the heart of your woes. 

What is important is the recognition that anxiety is normal and exists due to a set of bodily functions that have existed in us from our cave-man days.

Feeling extreme fear or worry can be a problem, particularly if it interferes with daily life. There are many types of anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

You may have a very identifiable cause for your anxiety; a traumatic incident, lots of stressors or have undergone a significant life event (moving house, getting divorced, having surgery, losing money). However, some people don’t have an identifiable cause for their anxiety and it causes them some distress. 

One way of thinking about your anxiety is to imagine your stress levels as being like a bucket of water. If we keep adding stressors to the bucket (even tiny ones like the school run or commuting to work), over time it fills up until one day it overflows.

This can be a good way of looking at anxiety as it explains why sometimes it can seem to come out of the blue with no significant trigger. However, what has happened is that the trigger was just a very small stressor that tipped us over the edge and allowed our bucket to overflow.

What we need is a leaky bucket with lots of holes in to reduce your overall stress levels. Each one of these holes could be something positive that you do to manage your anxiety, such as yoga, exercise, reading, listening to music or spending time with friends or family.


Symptoms of anxiety

People often experience physical, psychological and behavioural symptoms when they feel anxious or are stressed.

These symptoms are common, and its the bodies way of letting us know that it wants to heal.


Some of the most common physical symptoms of anxiety are:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased muscle tension
  • “Jelly legs”
  • Tingling in the hands and feet
  • Hyperventilation (over breathing)
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Wanting to use the toilet more often
  • Feeling sick
  • Tight band across the chest area
  • Tension headaches
  • Hot flushes
  • Increased perspiration
  • Dry mouth
  • Shaking
  • Choking sensations
  • Palpitations

Some of the most common psychological symptoms (the thoughts or altered perceptions we have) of anxiety are:

  • Thinking that you may lose control and/or go “mad”
  • Thinking that you might die
  • Thinking that you may have a heart attack/be sick/faint/have a brain tumour
  • Feeling that people are looking at you and observing your anxiety
  • Feeling as though things are speeding up/slowing down
  • Feeling detached from your environment and the people in it
  • Feeling like wanting to run away/escape from the situation
  • Feeling on edge and alert to everything around you

The most common behavioral symptom (the things we do when we are anxious) is avoidance. Although avoiding an anxiety provoking situation produces immediate relief from the anxiety, it is only a short term solution.

This means that whilst it may seem like avoiding is the best thing to do at the time, the anxiety often returns the next time that you face the situation and avoiding it will only psychologically reinforce the message that there is danger. The problem with avoidance is that you never get to find out whether your fear about the situation and what would happen is actually true.

Help is at hand. 

Click here or give us a call on 0800 111 032 to book to come in to see us to help investigate what may be causing your emotional anxiety and what we can do to help you move into the present moment.

DISCLAIMER: We do not make any medical claims for the EAV/EDS SC-5, nor do we claim medical diagnostic ability for this hardware . The SC-5 functions as an ohmmeter and biofeedback instrument. The operator controls the use of the equipment.